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2015 F1 engine regulations

With the arrival of Honda as a partner for McLaren the 2015 season sees four manufacturers compete in Formula One. The 2015 F1 engine regulations remain the same as those in 2014, which was the first year of turbo power in the World Championship.

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The 2015 season is the second one with V6 hybrid turbo engines but there’s still a lot of confusion from the public as to the exact nature of the rules. As with every other rule in F1, the engine regulations have been interpreted differently by teams which led the FIA to issue additional guidelines for 2015.

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The FIA has issued clarification because the section of the rule book dealing with engine development only set out the rules for 2014. The intention in the rule book was that teams don’t introduce new parts after a set date during preseason testing but because the rule book mentioned 28 February 2014, it’s no longer doing what it set out to do.

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Photos: Wikimedia commons

The FIA has issued clarification because the section of the rule book dealing with engine development only set out the rules for 2014. The intention in the rule book was that teams don’t introduce new parts after a set date during preseason testing but because the rule book mentioned 28 February 2014, it’s no longer doing what it set out to do.

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Photos: Wikimedia commons

The FIA has now advised the three manufacturers from 2014 that their basic homologated units would be the same as they were in 2014 but that’s not the case for Honda of course.

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For those new to F1 the basic engine rules allow for 1.6 litre turbocharged with an energy recovery system that boost power. The current crop of engines are the first turbo motors since 1988.

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The rules dictate a 90-degree engine bank with a fixed crankshaft. The engines are limited to 15,000 RPM.

Fastest Cars in F1 History

Photos: Wikimedia commons

The rules dictate a 90-degree engine bank with a fixed crankshaft. The engines are limited to 15,000 RPM.

Fastest Cars in F1 History

Photos: Wikimedia commons

The engines are being referred to as “power units” because they’re hybrid. The energy recovery portion of the unit is said to provide up to 200BHP.

Fastest Cars in F1 History

Photos: Wikimedia commons

Teams can only use four engines per car in 2015 and manufacturers are only allowed limited development which means the new boys Honda will struggle and that others like Ferrari and Renault will have trouble catching the dominant Mercedes power units.

Fastest Cars in F1 History

Photos: Wikimedia commons

Teams can only use four engines per car in 2015 and manufacturers are only allowed limited development which means the new boys Honda will struggle and that others like Ferrari and Renault will have trouble catching the dominant Mercedes power units.

Fastest Cars in F1 History

Photos: Wikimedia commons

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